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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 9:52 am 
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Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 2:46 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Royal Oak, MI
*EDIT** -- See my reply below about a possible PM66
Good Morning!

My name is Ben and I am a new member to the forums, long time peruser of various woodworking forums. I live in Royal Oak and do woodworking as a hobby as well as doing the occasional projects for friends. I recently built a coffee table and dining room table for good friends of mine that were in need that couldn't afford them otherwise and it really helped show me why I enjoy doing this, the smiles you see when you give someone a completed project. These projects definitely showed me a few things though. First and foremost, I need a better table saw. I have a super cheap Ryobi that I had bought to cut deck boards when I was building a deck for my (now) Wife and didn't need something with an amazing fence or anything like that. Knowing that the Table Saw is supposed to be the powerhouse of the shop, I am looking for solid recommendations based on the following.....

EDIT - IF I had to choose over a mobile TS and a non-mobile (I was told Portability Vs. Quality) - I would likely choose quality.

I have a very small space to work in - Our (detached) garage is my shop, and also lawn tool storage, bike storage, snowblower storage, etc. It isn't very deep but is two cars wide. Because of this, I need something that is at least semi-mobile.

While I am not a contractor (My day job is in software\application development and support), I do often do projects for other people, sometimes at their houses. While not a requirement, IF the tool could meet my needs, something that was more of a contractor saw and mobile would definitely be in the ballpark. I LOVE the fence system on the DeWalts - but understand I have been using a saw with a bare bottom fence to date, something that even stays a tiny bit parallel to the blade is amazing.

Preferably 110v. I do not have 220 out in the garage at this point in time. It would be possible to run 220, but I would have to trench and run wiring/a subpanel (which I can do), which I have not budgeted for.

I am not running a cabinet shop by any means. I am looking to make more furniture and better furniture\improve my skills. My wife currently wants a nicer coffee table, Dining Room table and dining room table chairs - I do not want to use pocket screws anymore if I can avoid it!

Under $600-750 - I will need to pickup more tools in order to start doing the finer parts of woodworking that I am looking to do - See below for the tools I currently own. Because of this, I have to spend a bit less on the Table Saw.
My understanding is that I should get a better table saw and then possibly pickup a jointer and\or Bandsaw. My concern about jointers is that most of the ones in my price range do not have longer beds and are 6" - Which I see warnings about all over the place.

Table Saws that I have seen and am considering....

Rigid R4512 and R4513
DeWalt DWE7491RS
Bosch 4100-09
Delta 36-725
A few Grizzlies and Deltas crossed my list as well - but I have seen varying opinions on them.
Anything that you would recommend to me.

Home Depot and Lowes both have some nice financing options that end today, so I am definitely interested in any thoughts. I'd also consider some hand tools (planes, etc.), as I follow Marc Spagnuolo\The Wood Whisperer and am trying to learn his Hybrid Woodworking methodology.

P.S. If anyone has a good source for wood in the area of Royal Oak, or a good place to drive from here, let me know - I go to Durst sometimes for their normal lumber\ply, but also go to HD\Lowes routinely.

P.P.S - Who do I talk to about membership and paying dues? I am not sure if I would be able to make meetings, but would like to at least support a local group!

Tools I own....
DeWalt 10" Dual Bevel Miter Saw
Craftsman RAS - Looking to get rid of this most likely.
DeWalt portable dual output compressor
Various Framing, 18 ga, 15 ga, palm nailers
DeWalt DW734 Planer (I have seen great and bad things about this, but this is what I have)
Milwaukee 6" ROS
DeWalt 1/4 sheet finishing sander
Older Craftsman router and (very small) router table
DeWalt Circular Saw


Last edited by Spartenos on Thu Jun 01, 2017 1:10 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 12:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:39 am
Posts: 134
Location: Plymouth
Welcome to the forum! There's a boatload of knowledge on this type of stuff and I'm sure you'll get some great pointers and recommendations. :)

I'll take a quick second to do what I do and be "that guy." :p Have you considered working more hand tools into your method of working? For under $750, you could add a core set of hand tools that will be "forever" quality tools.

Specifically, with the power tools you have today, you could add a quality set of bench chisels, a great jack plane with a couple of extra irons to help it do multiple tasks effectively, a good midsized rip-cut backsaw, and a couple of diamond bench stones for maintaining the edge tools. A jack plane with an iron ground for coarse work, and one ground for fine work, can do a shitload of heavy lifting on dressing stock -- removing wind, flattening the face, jointing the edges, and scrubbing down to size (and a jack plane doesn't care if you're working a slab or 3/4 stock). Chisels and a medium-tooth rip-cut backsaw open the world of traditional joinery using mortise and tenon, or dovetails (especially when you use your power router and templates as a compliment to hand work).

As someone that also has a detached garage, I will tell you why I am a 95% hand tool person -- I can work in the climate-controlled basement! :D No dust collection systems required. No noise dampening required to keep from irritating my significant other or waking up the kids during naptime. A broom and dustpan clean up 90% of the mess, with the occasional "put everything away and get out the shop vac" cleaning required.

It's something to think about, unless of course you've already gone down this road somewhat and simply decided it wasn't for you, which hey, fair enough! We all like different approaches, it makes the world go round.

if it piques your interest at all, you've probably seen/read/watched Marc Spagnuolo already, online personality that goes by the Wood Whisperer. But I definitely recommend checking him out because he's been a big proponent of (and wrote a well-liked book on) "hybrid woodworking," so, combining power tool and hand tool methods for effective and fun woodworking. His approach I think is actually very accessible to folks like you and I that are writing code during the day and woodworking as a hobby, because he seems to try and focus on the types of power tools and hand tools that are attainable in a hobbyist budget... he doesn't expect you to have a SawStop or Festool everything, and he doesn't expect you to have Blue Spruce chisels and Daed Toolworks handplanes.

Anyway you go, good luck, and back to the regularly scheduled programming... :)

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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 12:45 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2013 11:13 am
Posts: 269
Location: Dearborn, MI
On the topic of table saws. I went and bought the Bosch 4100 as my first table saw. Its a good saw but i had a lot of personal preference issues with it. The main one being the size of the saw. Its not very big in terms of distance in front of the blade and behind the blade. That makes cross cutting difficult and also makes long rips more difficult. I ended up building a whole table around the saw but that only helped the outfeed issue. I have since scored a good deal on a Unisaw that i had to fix up a bit. I would recommend a used saw to start and then go from there. The Ridgid R4512 looks like a good saw if you want a new one but a used saw should save you some more money.

Also if you dont need to move it over uneven ground a lot then i would avoid the folding stand saws.

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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 12:57 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 2:46 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Royal Oak, MI
jayed_coins wrote:
Welcome to the forum! There's a boatload of knowledge on this type of stuff and I'm sure you'll get some great pointers and recommendations. :)

I'll take a quick second to do what I do and be "that guy." :p Have you considered working more hand tools into your method of working? For under $750, you could add a core set of hand tools that will be "forever" quality tools.

Specifically, with the power tools you have today, you could add a quality set of bench chisels, a great jack plane with a couple of extra irons to help it do multiple tasks effectively, a good midsized rip-cut backsaw, and a couple of diamond bench stones for maintaining the edge tools. A jack plane with an iron ground for coarse work, and one ground for fine work, can do a shitload of heavy lifting on dressing stock -- removing wind, flattening the face, jointing the edges, and scrubbing down to size (and a jack plane doesn't care if you're working a slab or 3/4 stock). Chisels and a medium-tooth rip-cut backsaw open the world of traditional joinery using mortise and tenon, or dovetails (especially when you use your power router and templates as a compliment to hand work).

As someone that also has a detached garage, I will tell you why I am a 95% hand tool person -- I can work in the climate-controlled basement! :D No dust collection systems required. No noise dampening required to keep from irritating my significant other or waking up the kids during naptime. A broom and dustpan clean up 90% of the mess, with the occasional "put everything away and get out the shop vac" cleaning required.

It's something to think about, unless of course you've already gone down this road somewhat and simply decided it wasn't for you, which hey, fair enough! We all like different approaches, it makes the world go round.

if it piques your interest at all, you've probably seen/read/watched Marc Spagnuolo already, online personality that goes by the Wood Whisperer. But I definitely recommend checking him out because he's been a big proponent of (and wrote a well-liked book on) "hybrid woodworking," so, combining power tool and hand tool methods for effective and fun woodworking. His approach I think is actually very accessible to folks like you and I that are writing code during the day and woodworking as a hobby, because he seems to try and focus on the types of power tools and hand tools that are attainable in a hobbyist budget... he doesn't expect you to have a SawStop or Festool everything, and he doesn't expect you to have Blue Spruce chisels and Daed Toolworks handplanes.

Anyway you go, good luck, and back to the regularly scheduled programming... :)


Thanks for the welcome!

I definitely have considered\would consider (some) hand tools! I actually have a copy of Marc's book and recently picked up his guild project for the dining room chairs. One of the main reasons that I gravitate towards power tools is time right now - I have very little extra time. My "free time" is split between fishing, camping, SCUBA, events with friends, you get the picture. One of my hesitations (and I haven't yet had a chance to actually read his book!) is that I simply have not worked with most hand tools. I would have a learning curve in addition to the additional time (at least, to my understanding) that using a hand tool takes. That being said - I am not opposed to learning what I consider to be an important skill, and one that I am sure would serve me well later in life.

I would welcome your recommendations on some hand tools as well! Although, I am definitely in need of the table saw - I've always been intrigued by hand tools and feel they still very much have a place in a shop.


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 12:59 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 2:46 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Royal Oak, MI
Jared Shroyer wrote:
On the topic of table saws. I went and bought the Bosch 4100 as my first table saw. Its a good saw but i had a lot of personal preference issues with it. The main one being the size of the saw. Its not very big in terms of distance in front of the blade and behind the blade. That makes cross cutting difficult and also makes long rips more difficult. I ended up building a whole table around the saw but that only helped the outfeed issue. I have since scored a good deal on a Unisaw that i had to fix up a bit. I would recommend a used saw to start and then go from there. The Ridgid R4512 looks like a good saw if you want a new one but a used saw should save you some more money.

Also if you dont need to move it over uneven ground a lot then i would avoid the folding stand saws.


I did see a used Delta 36-725 in the classifieds, that would be similar to the R4512 - Are you referring to something like that or something different for a used saw?

I DO have an RAS for crosscutting - but I was thinking of getting rid of it as it takes up room and I rarely use it....

I am very mechanically apt, so fixing things isn't out of the question, just a time issue....


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 1:38 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:39 am
Posts: 134
Location: Plymouth
Hey Ben,

I hear ya. In a really good week I probably squeak 8 hours of woodworking in. I'll admit I'm a "stop and smell the roses" kinda guy anyhow, so the by hand approach suits me in that regard.

If you've got Marc's book, you'll probably learn a ton from that once you get a chance to crack into it. If you do find yourself interested down the line in adding some hand work into your repetoire, I suggest reading all things Chris Schwarz, and looking at Paul Sellers' free YouTube channel. Both are great, but each guy takes a different tack.

Schwarz focuses mostly on handwork in his writing (and the writings of others that he publishes). While he seems to have more and more focused on handwork as his career has gone on, he still seems to regularly try to write about multiple approaches -- e.g. here's how to do this with your bit and brace, here's how to do it with your cordless drill, and here's how to do it with a drill press.

Sellers is a bit dogmatic in his approach. He's very against most machine working and doesn't pass up opportunities to say so. In spite of the annoyance that might cause, it's worth watching his videos. He's a great teacher, and the way they produce the videos is no-frills, but the shots are clear and show you exactly what you want to see. The thing about Sellers is, when he gripes along the lines of, "Why would anyone waste time setting up their router to do this?" it actually makes sense when you watch him and put yourself in his shoes -- he's so experienced and proficient with handwork that it would in fact be insanity for him to setup a dovetail jig or a dado stack when the machine setup time takes just as long as it takes him to cut the joint with a few hand tools. It's equal parts inspirational and tremendously humbling.

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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 3:18 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2009 9:06 am
Posts: 1119
Location: Trenton, Michigan
I'm interested seeing any advise on how a track saw would meet his needs. I don't have a track saw, so no experience here.
Steve.


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 3:31 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 2:46 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Royal Oak, MI
Steve,

In all honesty, I have looked at getting a track saw eventually to cut sheet goods - I will likely wait until I am doing more with sheet goods before I pick one up though. Right now, the few of my projects lined up wouldn't benefit from one.


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 3:58 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 05, 2015 3:22 pm
Posts: 35
Re: Jointers

I have limited experience with them, but unless you have a big shop and a (relatively) big budget, a 8 inch jointer is probably out of reach. You can get a used Grizzly 8 inch for $500-800, but it will be 240v. It will also have a big footprint and be quite heavy. While the 6 inch jointers can be somewhat limited in the size of wood you can put through them, I'm fine with mine because of its portability and ability to run on 120v power.


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 4:27 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 2:46 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Royal Oak, MI
Jacob Bender wrote:
Re: Jointers

I have limited experience with them, but unless you have a big shop and a (relatively) big budget, a 8 inch jointer is probably out of reach. You can get a used Grizzly 8 inch for $500-800, but it will be 240v. It will also have a big footprint and be quite heavy. While the 6 inch jointers can be somewhat limited in the size of wood you can put through them, I'm fine with mine because of its portability and ability to run on 120v power.


What do you use? What's the max length you would run on it?


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 5:26 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 28, 2015 9:01 pm
Posts: 31
Location: Livonia, MI
A few thoughts based on my own experiences:

- What Ryobi saw do you have?

My setup is based off 2 BT3100's with parts added in some BT3000's & the craftsman version of the BT3100. The fences on those grab both the front and back rail, but can be sorely out of alignment if the back side isn't adjusted properly and doesn't catch on.

I didn't like the stands they came with and went and built my own to combine them along with space for routers in the middle. For the curious, I quickly found I hated the fuss and adjustments of changing blades, so I decided it would be easier to just have 1 saw dedicated to cross-cuts & one dedicated to ripping.

Some pictures I posted a while back in another forum for reference:
http://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/discus ... frankensaw


- You're probably going to want some good casters if you start making shop fixtures that can move around. Creative Industrial Sales mentioned in this thread is a good place to start (their 4" casters are what I used for my saw base and work wonderfully):
topic15952.html


- Set up some craigslist email alerts for what you're looking for. Really good tool deals come and go quickly. Ideally you'd want to be able to respond to a post within the first 30-40 minutes if you want a chance.

Sometimes lumber deals can be had on craigslist that aren't listed as well -- chances are that if someone is moving and selling off multiple woodworking machines, they probably have lumber and / or shop fixtures that they'd be willing to sell cheaply as well.


- Keep an eye out on estate sales. Most local sales now are up on estatesales.net -- just remember that the photos are only part of the story. Many of my better deals for smaller tools & hardware have been on things that weren't shown online -- when you look through listings, just ask yourself the question: "If he was the type of person to have X and Y, what else might he have had lying around?"

Hand tools can often be had for next to nothing and sellers can get desperate to move bulky items like lumber or large tools on the final days of sales.

More is usually better -- if you show up to the register with 1-2 things that look like they're worth something you'll likely get quoted a higher price than if you show up with the same items in a box full of screws, off-cuts, & sandpaper.


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 5:36 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 8:12 pm
Posts: 1842
Location: Ypsilanti
If you already have a RAS, I would increase use of that rather than plan to get rid of it. It might need a new fence. It might need a new table. It might need a new blade: one that is intended for an RAS rather than for a TS will be less grabby. But all of this is much cheaper than a new TS.

I know that RASes are less-popular now and have a negative reputation, especially among younger guys who have never used one. I know that some are better than others. And I admit I have 2 RASes and 3 TSes in active use, and several more of each (most all vintage iron from the 1950s) that are rebuild projects.

But an RAS takes up less floor-space because the wood always lays the same way no matter if you are ripping or crosscutting. My two active RASes are built-into benches that are 8' or 18' long. Both have 7' or 8'-long fences. With aux supports (and moving a few things out of the way) I can either crosscut or rip 16-footers. I have not yet seen the TS that I'd want to use to either crosscut or rip a 16'-er. What else? There is lots of room under my RAS benches for storage cabinets. Try that with a TS. One of my long RAS benches also has a DP built-in, and soon will have a router-table, too. While this is do-able with a TS (and I do have a TS with a router-table wing, and a shared fence) it's not a real-long fence nor real-long table.

RAS safety issues? Learn to be safe with the RAS you have. Get the proper blade, which will be less grabby. Set the guard to the right height, get the lower guard if it is missing, and use the anti-kickback fingers, properly set, for ripping.

Other comments:

Membership: If you are here you are a member. But you must bring cookies to your first meeting; the next one is June 8.

If you get into handplaning you will want a sturdy bench. I don't think you mentioned having a bench. It needn't be fancy but it should be rigid.

Lastly, I have an 8" York (I think) short-bed jointer that I had planned on replacing the motor on. I have the motor I was gonna use, but I have a 6" jointer that I really like, and a 12" jointer that I plan to get going, and I am gonna sell this 8". It has a mobility set that I made that works real well. 2 Hp, it will need 230V. (The previous owner had a 3-phase motor and a mickey-moused phase converter; I have already removed that motor.)

The jointer is at my place up north, and I am no good at digital photos. $300, with motor not installed, delivered to Royal Oak. Sometime in July would be better for me; June is a busy month. We can negotiate between now and then if you are interested; I am in no hurry.

You could be interested in one of my Craftsman or Delta antique 1950s TSes, too, but they are also projects.

Welcome to the group.


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 10:31 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 05, 2015 3:22 pm
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I have an old Atlas jointer with a 36" long bed. It gets a tad uneven if the wood is longer than 5-6 feet, but how often do you really need a piece of wood that long? I generally just cut it shorter and mill it that way.


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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2017 4:00 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 1:04 am
Posts: 316
Location: Howell
SteveStram wrote:
I'm interested seeing any advise on how a track saw would meet his needs. I don't have a track saw, so no experience here.
Steve.


I've had the Festool 75 for two years and haven't used my table saw (Inexpensive Craftsman model) since.
Dead straight cuts and has eliminated my jointer as well.
Portable, minimal setup are a couple advantages. I can cut from 75" - 25'+ based on the assorted track I have available. (25' has been the max so far.)
I'm using rough sawn stock so for me, it makes sense.
Majority of my projects don't require being "dead flat" and if necessary, I can plane the surface afterwards.
Just my $.02.

Mike

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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2017 7:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 2:46 pm
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Location: Royal Oak, MI
Dial-up Dave wrote:
If you already have a RAS, I would increase use of that rather than plan to get rid of it. It might need a new fence. It might need a new table. It might need a new blade: one that is intended for an RAS rather than for a TS will be less grabby. But all of this is much cheaper than a new TS.

I know that RASes are less-popular now and have a negative reputation, especially among younger guys who have never used one. I know that some are better than others. And I admit I have 2 RASes and 3 TSes in active use, and several more of each (most all vintage iron from the 1950s) that are rebuild projects.

But an RAS takes up less floor-space because the wood always lays the same way no matter if you are ripping or crosscutting. My two active RASes are built-into benches that are 8' or 18' long. Both have 7' or 8'-long fences. With aux supports (and moving a few things out of the way) I can either crosscut or rip 16-footers. I have not yet seen the TS that I'd want to use to either crosscut or rip a 16'-er. What else? There is lots of room under my RAS benches for storage cabinets. Try that with a TS. One of my long RAS benches also has a DP built-in, and soon will have a router-table, too. While this is do-able with a TS (and I do have a TS with a router-table wing, and a shared fence) it's not a real-long fence nor real-long table.

RAS safety issues? Learn to be safe with the RAS you have. Get the proper blade, which will be less grabby. Set the guard to the right height, get the lower guard if it is missing, and use the anti-kickback fingers, properly set, for ripping.

Other comments:

Membership: If you are here you are a member. But you must bring cookies to your first meeting; the next one is June 8.

If you get into handplaning you will want a sturdy bench. I don't think you mentioned having a bench. It needn't be fancy but it should be rigid.

Lastly, I have an 8" York (I think) short-bed jointer that I had planned on replacing the motor on. I have the motor I was gonna use, but I have a 6" jointer that I really like, and a 12" jointer that I plan to get going, and I am gonna sell this 8". It has a mobility set that I made that works real well. 2 Hp, it will need 230V. (The previous owner had a 3-phase motor and a mickey-moused phase converter; I have already removed that motor.)

The jointer is at my place up north, and I am no good at digital photos. $300, with motor not installed, delivered to Royal Oak. Sometime in July would be better for me; June is a busy month. We can negotiate between now and then if you are interested; I am in no hurry.

You could be interested in one of my Craftsman or Delta antique 1950s TSes, too, but they are also projects.

Welcome to the group.


Dave - Thanks for all of the in-depth response! It would definitely be something for me to consider - How difficult is it to work on\replace motors on these units?

One thing that I am working on is building a solid workbench. You are correct, it is something I don't currently have as a "great one" right now. I use whatever flat surface is available. It's on my list of projects to build, just need to plan it out and actually build it...


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:17 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 2:46 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Royal Oak, MI
I thought I would ask the following since you all have been so helpful.

I know I said I was going to spend at most 750 and all - BUT.....

I found a PM-66 on Craigslist, thanks to a posting in the forums here. 1 phase, 5 HP, some surface rust. Comes with an accufence and the PM mobile base.

The guy is asking $1800 for it, which from my research, seems high. I'm willing to go over what I had originally budgeted, because from what I have seen, this saw should last me for all eternity and do absolutely anything and everything I ever wanted.

In terms of 220, I would have to run a line to my garage, but in the mean time, I do have a generator that would work in a pinch.

Is 1800 a fair price? assuming it is "like new" as he says, or should I be offering lower? I already reached out to him to start discussions. Pictures of it below.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2017 4:58 pm 
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Obsessed

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 8:27 pm
Posts: 1904
Location: ann arbor
$1800 does not strike me as high for that saw (5HP 1 ph) assuming it's in good condition. check the trunnions, table casting, etc. bring a good straight edge, and ideally, an indicator to check for runout in the arbor.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2017 8:52 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2014 9:09 am
Posts: 173
Location: Ypsilanti
Not a fan of older powermatics. Make sure tables are flat. I've seen some really bad ones.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 9:16 am 
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Master

Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:39 am
Posts: 134
Location: Plymouth
Hey Ben, before you dive in on that PM, check out this post that just popped up and is pretty timely for some of the discussion here:

http://www.minimalistwoodworker.com/blo ... pprentices

He talks about how he's foregone a table saw happily, and instead invested in the track saw some of our friends above have mentioned.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 1:24 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 4:17 pm
Posts: 1002
Location: Farmington Hills
I would check on the cost to run a line to your garage first, with a fuse box in the garage.
How big is your main fuse box, also figure in the power needs for a dust collector.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 9:25 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:30 am
Posts: 856
Location: ann arbor
These are reportedly good saws, one third the price (before negotiating)of the Powermatic and dual voltage so no need to put in 220v right away.

https://annarbor.craigslist.org/tls/6158703330.html


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 12:55 pm 
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Obsessed

Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 8:12 pm
Posts: 1842
Location: Ypsilanti
Regarding the 8" jointer I offered:

In general, replacing a motor on a belt-drive machine is pretty easy, and I have done it many times. That said, this is not the easiest machine to work on because the motor is inside the pedestal stand and it is pretty tight in there. Beyond that, it's been several years since I first acquired this and took the old motor out and I don't remember any details. But it's been on my far-back burner so long, and I have two jointers I like well enough, so I decided to abandon the project.


Last edited by Dial-up Dave on Mon Jun 05, 2017 3:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 8:31 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 9:53 pm
Posts: 784
Location: South Lyon
kludwig wrote:
These are reportedly good saws, one third the price (before negotiating)of the Powermatic and dual voltage so no need to put in 220v right away.

https://annarbor.craigslist.org/tls/6158703330.html


It's gone.


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