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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 8:11 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2017 6:06 am
Posts: 17
Location: Howell MI
Good morning all,

I was wondering if any of you have ever tried to cut unbacked veneer (about .040 thick) with a table saw? In the past I started with a razor knife, then a moved to a veneer saw and while the veneer saw is very good for smaller pieces the long runs that I make for drum building are a bit of a pain. Now that I have a good (good for a contractors saw; Bosch 4100) table saw I thought, with a good out feed table this may work. I would imagine a very high tooth count blade set low in the table should work, thoughts? I also don't want to destroy some not-so-cheap Kurillian birch just for the sake of saving time, but I am doing a couple larger drums and cutting a 70+ inch run with a small veneer saw is going to be rough.

Any help would be appreciated.


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 9:05 am 
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Obsessed

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 8:27 pm
Posts: 1841
Location: ann arbor
yeah... i've had some marginal success with longer lengths by using my table saw (slider)... best i can tell, you have to make full cauls, ideally of 3/4" sheet goods, to sandwich the veneer between, then cut through the stack. it's a bit annoying and wasteful. i found that the best cuts i achieved were with a 60 tooth combo blade, raised all the way up.

if you're doing this on a regular table saw, obviously you need a reference edge to run against the fence.

a better option might be cutting with a track saw. there are a number of threads on various boards on this technique, google will find it.

good luck, let us know what you end up doing.

-- dz


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 8:00 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2017 6:06 am
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Location: Howell MI
Thank you for the track saw tip but that is currently out of my price range. The sacrificial wood is a good idea though. I found a good YouTube video on this as well but the guy is using a paper backed veneer so I am not sure how that would compare to my unbacked veneer. I will probably just have to sacrifice a small piece and just do some trial and error to see where it gets me.


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 8:00 pm 
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Obsessed

Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 8:12 pm
Posts: 1790
Location: Ypsilanti
I made a demo at some prior meeting about "jointing" with a router and a piece of 1-full-inch x 12" MDF stairtread for a fence. I think this fence is 100" long and with the router jig I made it can cut a little bit longer. With this method, I clamp the guide fence on top of the stock, to a table or bench. The cutting path does not cut into the fence. It didn't cost very much, and I even have available an extra fence and the original router jig I made of wood, before I made a better one of aluminum.

With this set-up, you could joint edges of your veneer accurately with a router. Then you could make your rough cuts with a knife or whatever. (It is also good for jointing things that are too big to put across the jointer itself, whether they are wide or long boards or a tabletop or benchtop itself).

PM me if interested. Also, if some meeting planner wants me to demo this again, I'm willing. There were not many people there when I did it a couple years ago.


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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 8:04 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2017 6:06 am
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Location: Howell MI
Dial-up Dave wrote:
I made a demo at some prior meeting about "jointing" with a router and a piece of 1-full-inch x 12" MDF stairtread for a fence. I think this fence is 100" long and with the router jig I made it can cut a little bit longer. With this method, I clamp the guide fence on top of the stock, to a table or bench. The cutting path does not cut into the fence. It didn't cost very much, and I even have available an extra fence and the original router jig I made of wood, before I made a better one of aluminum.

With this set-up, you could joint edges of your veneer accurately with a router. Then you could make your rough cuts with a knife or whatever. (It is also good for jointing things that are too big to put across the jointer itself, whether they are wide or long boards or a tabletop or benchtop itself).

PM me if interested. Also, if some meeting planner wants me to demo this again, I'm willing. There were not many people there when I did it a couple years ago.


Please bare with me as I'm new to wood working so some of the jargon get's lost in my head. Basically what you're saying is you created a 100" long guide for a router with the idea being; I would rough cut (lets say within 1/4" of final DIM) and then clamp this guide on top of the veneer against my work table so that the straight edge of the guide is aligned with the final cut line on the veneer. Then run straight bit with bearing in my router along the guide to remove any excess veneer stock and have a perfectly square cut. Is this assumption correct?


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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 8:12 am 
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Obsessed

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 8:27 pm
Posts: 1841
Location: ann arbor
i'd probably use a sharp spiral bit, but yeah, i think that's what dave is saying... good technique - yields a very clean cut.


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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 11:11 pm 
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Obsessed

Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 8:12 pm
Posts: 1790
Location: Ypsilanti
All your assumptions are right except I don't use a bit with a bearing. The jig (router base) I made has a ledge or step on the bottom that follows the edge of the guide-board.

I am not a huge fan of router bits with bearings: If there is a divot in your guide-fence, the bearing will drop into it. Also sometimes I have had bearings fall off or the collar slip and the bearing slides up the shank and in either case, it can ruin the template or fence and ruin the workpiece. In my case, sliding a maybe 18"-long ledged router base on a 100" fence, if there is any nick in the fence I just slide right past it, and that's also how, with care, I can joint stock that is even a bit longer than the fence.

Also, Zaret is right, spiral bits are preferrable. In fact, I often use endmills (metal-cutting tools similar to spiral router bits). They come in a wide variety of sizes and lengths. It took a very long endmill to joint the edge of my 3-1/2"-thick ash benchtop. The trick is finding endmills with 1/2" shanks because most of them are shanked to size (shank diam = cutting diam). But for your veneer purpose, either a straight or spiral router bit or an endmill would work, and great length is not required.

Essentially this is a home-made router-guide "track" but much cheaper than the commercial varieties. I am no good at digital photos but I could demonstrate it at a meeting again if people are interested.


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