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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 11:12 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:41 am
Posts: 8
Location: Dexter, MI
Hello everyone, In the project that I'm currently building, I have to join a 7/16" side with a 3/4" side in butt joint configuration. I was hoping to utilize the dominos for this joint. The problem is that the smallest cutter I have is the 5mm and the minimum plunge of this cutter will end up creating a through mortise in the 7/16" piece. I thought I'll embrace this limitation and try to get the look described here http://www.timbercabinets.com.au/tips-tricks-8/ . In the article they use custom made dominos. I was wondering if the same look can be obtained using the stock 5mm tenons? I'm okay with the rounded look of the stock tenons. If anybody has experience with through tenons using the domino joiner, I'd love to hear it! Any other feedback to avoid through mortising in my situation, is also welcome! Thanks in advance!

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 5:28 am 
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Master

Joined: Sun Feb 06, 2005 11:47 pm
Posts: 172
Location: Madison Heights, Mich.
if you don't want a thru tenon, why not use a spacer block that will only allow the cutter to make a 1/4 inch mortise into the thin stock.

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Dominic Palazzola
Pipe and Wire by day
wood and glue by night.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 11:51 pm 
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Obsessed

Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 8:12 pm
Posts: 1826
Location: Ypsilanti
If the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail. If the only tool you have is a Domino, every problem looks like a place to use the Domino.

In other words, perhaps this is not the most-appropriate tool for this particular task. Biscuits, rabbet or dado, splines in routed-slots, regular or sliding dovetails, or in fact an actual, genuine, real through-tenon, all might be more appropriate than trying to put ten pounds of stuff in a 5-pound bag.

If the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 12:28 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:39 am
Posts: 124
Location: Plymouth
Dial-up Dave wrote:
If the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail. If the only tool you have is a Domino, every problem looks like a place to use the Domino.

In other words, perhaps this is not the most-appropriate tool for this particular task. Biscuits, rabbet or dado, splines in routed-slots, regular or sliding dovetails, or in fact an actual, genuine, real through-tenon, all might be more appropriate than trying to put ten pounds of stuff in a 5-pound bag.

If the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.


Agreed.

And, chopping a mortise of 7/16" depth with a mallet and bench chisel -- even if you are doing something like double tenons on each side for 8 total mortises -- won't take very long.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 10:34 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:04 pm
Posts: 1361
Location: Ann Arbor
Well...I'm not a purist. I've built things that look like through tenons but aren't. And used Kreg pocket hole fasteners where the sun don't shine. It's an interesting philosophical discussion whether the goal of woodworking is to have the finished piece or to know what went into it when you look at it. I'm of two minds on that. Knowing that my pins and splines on my Greene & Greene stuff has real mahogany and ebony makes it seem more authentic, and using a lock miter joint instead of dovetail on a drawer is just fine too.

Might be a good discussion some day.

Jay


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 8:38 am 
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Joined: Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:06 am
Posts: 659
Location: Redford
I've attached a spacer on my Domino fence to allow for non-through in thinner stock, but can also appreciate the unique look of going with the through route as well. I'm sure you've already thought of it, but as a more contrasting alternative, they also make the Mahogany Dominos which could enhance the look you're going for.

And yes, because I have a Domino, most projects I would make would incorporate it's use. Really is faster and in most cases as strong. Will leave the arguments of better to those that care a bit more than me.

Having said that, I've had and sold off the 2-3 (Have one currently I may not keep yet again) Domino machines I've had simply because they're far too expensive for me to justify owning for the inconsistent uses I need it for.

For those looking for a Domino, I highly suggest the older style, pin fence as opposed to the newer current "flapper" fence. Don't care for the flappers at all on my current one, the pins were of much more utility and versatility.

Julian


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 9:18 am 
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Master

Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:39 am
Posts: 124
Location: Plymouth
Obviously, it depends if you're in this to buy food or if you're a weekend warrior. For a weekend warrior, I think the most important thing is enjoying the journey. That being said, that doesn't at all mean anything about taking a "pure" approach or only using traditional methods -- it simply means that we all need to find the journey that suits our personalities and makes the projects enjoyable to us.

In this particular case, I was on board with Dave's point about a traditional through mortise and tenon because it really would be a very fast joint to cut in thinner stock like this, it has got nothing to do with "purity." :p

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 11:13 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:41 am
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Location: Dexter, MI
Thanks for the replies. The domino joinery is new to me so I am using this project to practice techniques. There is a learning curve to using any tool and like many, unless I force myself to use the tool in a project, I won't learn. Also I find forums to be very helpful in learning as it brings out diverse opinions and suggestions in one platform and in many cases leads to that "Aha" moment. I didn't know that the so called "spacers" existed and also something called "Rick's supplemental manual". I ended up buying the spacers and they solved my problem!

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 2:17 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:39 am
Posts: 124
Location: Plymouth
glitchkb wrote:
Thanks for the replies. The domino joinery is new to me so I am using this project to practice techniques. There is a learning curve to using any tool and like many, unless I force myself to use the tool in a project, I won't learn. Also I find forums to be very helpful in learning as it brings out diverse opinions and suggestions in one platform and in many cases leads to that "Aha" moment. I didn't know that the so called "spacers" existed and also something called "Rick's supplemental manual". I ended up buying the spacers and they solved my problem!


Sweet!

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