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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 9:54 am 
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Obsessed
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Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 1:39 pm
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Location: Livonia
I want to make a tool that requires a short section of a mill file. How would you recommend cutting it? I don't want to do anything to compromise the temper of the steel, so I would think something like a plasma cutter would be out of the question (I don't have one anyway). I do have an angle grinder with a cutoff wheel which is what I think I'd use if someone can't suggest something better, but again I'm concerned about getting it too hot.

Thanks!

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 10:30 am 
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Abrasive cutoff wheel. Quench periodically to avoid over heating.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 1:59 pm 
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Location: Farmington Hills
+1 cutoff wheel
It's high carbon and hard it would reck bandsaw blades.
If it gets to hot you can always bring it over and we can reheat teat it in the forge.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2016 8:27 pm 
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I'd use an angle grinder with a very thin (1/16" or 0.040") cutting wheel. Once you have used the thin wheels you will never want to use a 1/4" wheel for cutting. Just never grind on the side of the wheel or put side-pressure on it.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2016 3:57 am 
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Dial-up Dave wrote:
I'd use an angle grinder with a very thin (1/16" or 0.040") cutting wheel. Once you have used the thin wheels you will never want to use a 1/4" wheel for cutting. Just never grind on the side of the wheel or put side-pressure on it.



+1 & safety shield, vise
Wid T

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2016 8:36 am 
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Cut off wheel and constant water, that way the temper should not be affected. I'm thinking dremmel or tile cutter.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2016 10:21 am 
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I'll have to find one of those thin wheels. Sounds like the ticket for this job.

Thanks!

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>>--Steve Sawyer->>
A bad day working with tools is better than a good day doing most of the other things I have to do.
blog: http://www.stephensawyer.com


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2016 5:08 pm 
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I recently was following an old thread on OWWM about blades for a 1937 Duro model 3035 jointer, which turns out to be the (previously unknown) old jointer I have. They talked about using water-jet cutting to make slots in the blades for the odd cutter-head this jointer has. It cost somebody about $100, I think, to make four slots in each of six (two sets) of blades, but the talk was that this form of high-tech cutting did not hurt the hardness of the blades, since the cutting medium is actual water.

Still, for a file, I'd use the thin wheels I suggested, although a wet tile-saw is an interesting suggestion.

If you can't find these thin wheels (they are sometimes hard to find) I have often found them at Delux Rental (at Congress and Hewitt streets in Ypsi) which seems like an odd place to buy tools, but they have some very interesting stuff, including very coarse abrasives like 36-grit they use for floor-sanders. The thin wheels might be called "Razor-Blades" which is one brand name I've seen. You'll probably need to flip over the reversible washer "flange" or nut in your grinder, and maybe even add a shim so the grinder flanges can grab these very thin wheels. A shim made of heavy paper like file-folder is fine.

(And I might get a Byrd head for the Duro, a very cool 6" jointer with a lot of neat features, except for the cutterhead which I think would still be a PITA even with the slotted blades.....)


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2016 10:37 pm 
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Thanks, Dave. TURNS out I already had some of those thin cutoff wheels and used that in an angle grinder. Quenched frequently in water and it turned out fine.

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>>--Steve Sawyer->>
A bad day working with tools is better than a good day doing most of the other things I have to do.
blog: http://www.stephensawyer.com


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