Southeast Michigan Woodworkers

Gather, share, learn and enjoy with other woodworkers!
It is currently Sat Sep 23, 2017 4:03 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 10:41 am 
Offline
Elite
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2004 10:13 pm
Posts: 1265
Location: Washington, DC
Getting married in a couple months and it was suggested that I put a gas grill on the registry. I'd like to get something decent (maybe a three-burner model?), but not ridiculous (like, I don't need a rotisserie and three IR burners). Ideally in the $300-$500 range, from a decent brand. Any suggestions?

I do occasionally smoke ribs and brisket and such, but I usually use my charcoal Weber for that. This would be strictly something to keep on the deck to grill burgers, steaks, BBQ chicken, and whatnot.

Also, it would need to be available at Amazon.

Thanks!

_________________
http://www.jimknapp.us/Wood.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 11:09 am 
Offline
Obsessed

Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 3:53 pm
Posts: 6711
Location: Monroe
Weber. No other gas grill I'd buy. But after having a Big Green Egg for 2 years, I wouldn't buy another gas grill either. Food cooked over lump charcoal is just so much better and you can get higher temps. Steaks done at 500 degrees are fantastic. The BGE has proven to be a great grill and a great smoker and has been easy to use. One of my coworkers has a Weber kettle grill and loves it as much as I love my BGE. He uses lump charcoal as well but has a separate smoker--guess the kettle doesn't do as good on long cooks.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 12:10 pm 
Offline
Obsessed
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 5:59 pm
Posts: 1606
Location: Northville, MI
I would say Weber. If it breaks down in the future one of the big box stores should have your part.

Don't forget a cover. Any grill that stays outside should have one. Keeps it looking good for a long time.

_________________
Jim Young
http://www.simoli.net


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 12:15 pm 
Offline
Master
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2013 11:13 am
Posts: 265
Location: Dearborn, MI
I am going through the same process right now too. I dont see much that i like. seems like all the grills are just cheap and will be broken within 2 years.

_________________
Jared


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 1:03 pm 
Offline
Elite

Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2009 9:14 am
Posts: 1371
My Webber is in its 22nd year. Replacement parts are still available for it. Still on the original burners.
Not sure if Webber makes one in your price range though.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 2:20 pm 
Offline
Elite

Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 9:53 pm
Posts: 782
Location: South Lyon
If you've got the budget look at the Big Green Egg. It's out of my $$ but friends who have them would never go back to LP. As others have said check out Weber. As long as you stay above the low buck ones that they have you'll be fine.
FYI: Amazon doesn't sell the actual big green egg but it seems they have accessories.

d


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 4:47 pm 
Offline
Obsessed
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 1:39 pm
Posts: 5938
Location: Livonia
If you're going gas, I'd recommend natural gas.

+1 on the cover.

I've had my Weber gas grill for about 5 or 6 years, and it still works perfectly, even including the igniters. The only thing I've had to replace was the grates on top. It's a 3-burner unit and actually smokes really well. I do ribs, shoulder, brisket. I fashion two long foil "logs", one with the usual smoker chips, the second with big chunks and punctured with some holes to let the smoke out. I place them between the back burner and the grates. I set the single rear burner on its lowest setting, and via an electronic meat thermometer installed in the lid, it maintains a very consistent 220* to 230*. The chips start to smoke almost immediately and get used up pretty quick. By then the chunks are starting to smoke and continue to do so for a couple of hours. Handles all the usual grilling chores for burgers, steaks, corn, fish etc. etc.

A little pricier than you mention, but worth it IMO. The link below seems to be the closest current model to what I bought.

https://amzn.com/B0098HR10I

_________________
>>--Steve Sawyer->>
A bad day working with tools is better than a good day doing most of the other things I have to do.
blog: http://www.stephensawyer.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 7:26 pm 
Offline
Obsessed

Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 3:53 pm
Posts: 6711
Location: Monroe
The only problem with natural gas is that it burns even cooler than propane. The convenience would be nice though.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 8:45 pm 
Offline
Elite
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2004 9:27 pm
Posts: 928
Location: Galesburg, MI
Check out Holland grills. I love not having to deal with flare ups and it's hard to overcook things. Mine is about 10 years old and still in good shape. I keep it covered when not in use.

_________________
- Matt Erdmann


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2016 12:37 am 
Offline
Master

Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 10:08 am
Posts: 190
Location: Ann Arbor
I have the Weber Genesis E-310. It's been 5 years and still working like the day I got it. It's a good size but nothing to huge.
Would suggest it to anyone. Great grill.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2016 7:07 am 
Offline
Elite
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:18 pm
Posts: 357
Location: Waterloo Twp
+1 On the Weber Genesis. Very well built, will last many years if properly maintained.

_________________
Ed Swaner
Waterloo Twp.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2016 10:11 am 
Offline
Obsessed
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 1:39 pm
Posts: 5938
Location: Livonia
Matt Meiser wrote:
The only problem with natural gas is that it burns even cooler than propane. The convenience would be nice though.

Yeah - it's definitely a trade-off, but other than really thick steaks, I can't say it's been much of a problem. Nice to never run out of gas.

_________________
>>--Steve Sawyer->>
A bad day working with tools is better than a good day doing most of the other things I have to do.
blog: http://www.stephensawyer.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2016 8:51 pm 
Offline
Elite
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 10:16 am
Posts: 491
Location: Milford, MI
Webber! Mine is 13 years old and still cooking and looks pretty fair. We use it all year round, at least two nights a week. Still has the original burners.
I replaced the porcelain coated grates and "flavorizer bars" with the SST versions and now on cover #3. The igniter pushbutton broke but the spark igniter down by the burner is still the original 2003 igniter.
Bought ours at Lowes in November 2003 using a 10% discount courtesy of the US Postal Service when we moved to MI. This grill is still going strong.
Bought the replacement parts from Webber.
This is a three burner version. In 2003 called Webber Silver B or Webber Genisis Silver. Very similar versions available today with a slightly different name.
Best and longest lasting propane or natural gas grill I've had out of 4. Liked it so much I bought one for my parents for their up north summer home.
Price is probably going to be higher than $500.00 though.

Switching a propane grill to natural gas should not cause the grill to operate cooler than the propane version. If you convert a propane grill to natural gas, you must change out each orifice and probably eliminate the pressure reducing regulator.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2016 9:41 am 
Offline
Obsessed
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 5:59 pm
Posts: 1606
Location: Northville, MI
I've had the Genesis for about 15 years. Replaced the flavorizer bars and the grill bars three year ago. I have two propane tanks and one of them is my backup so I never run out of heat. Plus natural gas don't you have to hard plum it? That would make it non-movable.

_________________
Jim Young
http://www.simoli.net


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2016 9:46 am 
Offline
Obsessed
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 1:39 pm
Posts: 5938
Location: Livonia
Jim Young wrote:
Plus natural gas don't you have to hard plum it? That would make it non-movable.

They make quick-connect hoses for the purpose. The hose I have allows me to roll my grill from one end of the deck to the other, and I could even set it on the ground off the end of the deck if I wanted to. Has never been an issue for me, but yes, you are "tethered" to the house so that may or may not be a consideration.

_________________
>>--Steve Sawyer->>
A bad day working with tools is better than a good day doing most of the other things I have to do.
blog: http://www.stephensawyer.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2016 10:39 am 
Offline
Obsessed

Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 3:53 pm
Posts: 6711
Location: Monroe
Mike Black wrote:
Switching a propane grill to natural gas should not cause the grill to operate cooler than the propane version. If you convert a propane grill to natural gas, you must change out each orifice and probably eliminate the pressure reducing regulator.


I could have sworn when I checked into converting mine that the NG (they were already running piping for a generator, grill was another 20') the BTU rating was lower. May depend on the model.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2016 11:09 am 
Offline
Obsessed
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 1:39 pm
Posts: 5938
Location: Livonia
I know that the energy content per cft of propane is higher than that of methane (natural gas) but could it be the NG-specific orifices and regulator compensate for that?

_________________
>>--Steve Sawyer->>
A bad day working with tools is better than a good day doing most of the other things I have to do.
blog: http://www.stephensawyer.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2016 12:25 pm 
Offline
Elite

Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 10:04 am
Posts: 303
Location: Farmington Hills, MI
Steve Sawyer wrote:
but could it be the NG-specific orifices and regulator compensate for that?


It could but may not...in order to deliver the same heating rate the flow rate of natural gas would need to be increased to offset its reduced heating value (proane about 2,500 BTU/cu ft and natural gas about 1,000 BTU/cu ft) Since gaseous propane has a lower heating value about 2.5 times that of natural gas, which is mostly methane you would need to revise the pressure regulation and orificing to provide about 2.5 times the flow rate.

_________________
Kevin (Specialist in reconstituting the wood after a wayward toolpath)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2016 1:04 pm 
Offline
Obsessed
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 1:39 pm
Posts: 5938
Location: Livonia
Well, whatever the technical points are, I've never had any trouble getting plenty of heat for grilling anything I've ever put on it - I can reduce anything to a lump of charcoal! :mrgreen:

_________________
>>--Steve Sawyer->>
A bad day working with tools is better than a good day doing most of the other things I have to do.
blog: http://www.stephensawyer.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2016 5:25 pm 
Offline
Elite

Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2009 9:14 am
Posts: 1371
So what did you end up with?
I went to fire my Weber up yesterday and found the drip pan had rusted out.
I'm thinking the S-330 now.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Forum hosting by ProphpBB | Software by phpBB | Report Abuse | Privacy